Atlas Awards

The Atlas Awards are a collection of 35 international film awards presented annually by Atlas & Aeris as part of the Atlas Awards International Film Festival. The private, two-week, online festival is held each January and showcases excellent independent films to a global audience, culminating in the presentation of the Atlas Awards. Atlas & Aeris and a professional jury of award-winning independent filmmakers select the festival’s Official Selection and the Atlas Award winners, whom the magazine presents with official laurels, certificates of award, and engraved prizes. The Atlas Awards celebrate achievements of emerging and established filmmakers, screenwriters, and actors, as well as achievements in film production, different genres of film, and overall cinematic accomplishment. Ticket sales to the Atlas Awards International Film Festival are open to the public a few weeks prior to the start of the festival each January.

Atlas & Aeris selects submitted films for the festival's Official Selection, the collection of films chosen to screen at the annual festival. The magazine nominates films from the Official Selection for Atlas Awards: Editorial Awards are then selected by Atlas & Aeris, and Jury Prizes are selected by the jury. Films included in the Official Selection are screened at the festival and receive Official Selection laurels, a certificate of Official Selection, and recognition in Atlas & Aeris. Editorial Award winners are awarded with official laurels, a certificate of award, and recognition in Atlas & Aeris. Jury Prize winners are awarded with official laurels, a certificate of award, an engraved prize, and recognition in Atlas & Aeris.

 

THE AWARDS

Jury Prizes

Atlas Aeris

The Atlas Aeris Prize awards the year's Best Film with an official, engraved, bronze statue of Atlas, a certificate of award, official laurels, and recognition in Atlas & Aeris. 'Atlas Aeris' originates from the Latin for 'Atlas of Bronze' and represents the festival's commitment to internationalism and art. The prize is open to films of all lengths, genres, and countries of origin.

Atlas Vitri

The Atlas Vitri Prize awards the year's Best Foreign Language Film with an official, engraved, glass book, a certificate of award, official laurels, and recognition in Atlas & Aeris. 'Atlas Vitri' originates from the Latin for 'Glass Atlas' and represents the festival's commitment to internationalism and art. The prize is open to films of all lengths, genres, and countries of origin.

Jury Prize

The Jury Prize awards the film that, in the opinion of the jury, demonstrates the greatest promise on the part of the filmmaker. The prize celebrates the accomplishments of emerging filmmakers, especially first-time filmmakers, filmmakers with budgetary constraints, and students. The prize awards an official, engraved globe, a certificate award, official laurels, and recognition in Atlas & Aeris. The prize is open to films of all lengths, genres, and countries of origin.

Peace Prize

The Peace Prize awards the film that, in the opinion of the jury, advances peace to the greatest degree. The eligibility of film subjects for this prize is unlimited. The prize awards an official, engraved globe, a certificate of award, official laurels, and recognition in Atlas & Aeris. The prize is open to films of all lengths, genres, and countries of origin.

Editorial Awards

Best Overall Categories

Best Narrative Feature Film
Best Narrative Short Film
Best Documentary Feature Film
Best Documentary Short Film

 

Best Genre Categories

Best Action Film
Best Animated Film
Best Art Film
Best Comedy Film
Best Drama Film
Best Horror Film
Best New Media Film
Best Science Fiction Film

 

Best Emerging Filmmaker Categories

Best Student Film
Best First Film

 

Best Writing Categories

Best Original Feature Screenplay
Best Original Short Screenplay
Best Adapted Feature Screenplay
Best Adapted Short Screenplay

 

Individual Acting Awards

(GENDER-NEUTRAL)

Best Actor/Actress
Best Actress/Actor

 

Production Awards

Best Directing
Best Casting
Best Cinematography
Best Costume Design
Best Film Editing
Best Makeup and Hairstyling
Best Original Music
Best Production Design
Best Sound Editing
Best Special Effects
Best Visual Effects

 

Editorial Award winners are awarded with official laurels,
a certificate of award, and recognition in Atlas & Aeris.


 

Festival Recap: 2016

 

The 2016 Atlas Awards International Film Festival showcased 50 works by independent filmmakers from around the world with its annual international film awards and private online screening of officially-selected films. Atlas & Aeris hosted the festival with screenings from 15-29 January and announcements of this year's Atlas Awards on 30 and 31 January. Atlas & Aeris and a professional jury composed of award-winning independent filmmakers selected the 2016 Atlas Award-winners, whom the magazine presented with official engraved prizes and certificates of award.

The 2016 Official Selection comprises 50 works by independent filmmakers from around the world:

45 films and 5 screenplays from 17 countries

AtlasAwards2016Map

Countries represented in the 2016 Atlas Awards International Film Festival

  • Countries represented this year in order of their representation in the Official Selection are: the United States, Iran, Canada, Australia, France, Sweden, the United Kingdom, Afghanistan, GermanyGreece, ItalyKosovo, Russia, Slovakia, SpainTaiwan, and Turkey.*
  • Countries represented this year in order of their representation in the selection of Atlas Awards are: the United States, Iran, Canada, Kosovo, Russia, Spain, Afghanistan, Italy, Slovakia, Sweden, Turkey, and the United Kingdom.*
  • The country with the highest representation in the festival's Official Selection and in the selection of Atlas Awards is the United States.
  • After the United States, the country with the highest representation in the festival's Official Selection and in the selection of Atlas Awards is Iran.
  • The United States, Iran, and Canada are the countries with the highest representation in both the Official Selection and in the selection of Atlas Awards.
  • The European countries with the highest representation in the festival's Official Selection are France, Sweden, and the United Kingdom, whereas the European countries with the highest representation in the selection of Atlas Awards are Kosovo, Russia, and Spain.*

This year's top prizes went to an international selection of films:

The Atlas Aeris Prize for the year's best film of any genre went to Angels Die in the Soil, directed by Babak Amini of Iran.

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Angels Die in the Soil, directed by Babak Amini

The Atlas Vitri Prize for the year's best foreign language film went to Escapes, directed by Mercedes Gaspar of Spain.

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Escapes, directed by Mercedes Gaspar

The Jury Prize, awarded to the film that, in the opinion of the jury, demonstrates the greatest promise for future excellence on the part of the filmmaker, went to Omid, directed by Jawad Wahabzada of Afghanistan.

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Omid, directed by Jawad Wahabzada

The Human Rights Prize, awarded to the year’s best film whose subject is a significant topic of human rights, went to Where Are You My Love?, directed by Merve Gezen of Turkey.

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Where Are You My Love?, directed by Merve Gezen

Festival Recap: Women in Film

Women directed one third of the films selected for the 2016 Atlas Awards International Film Festival, directed one half of this year’s documentaries, and wrote or co-wrote more than half of the festival’s officially-selected screenplays. The countries with the highest representation of films directed by women in the festival are Australia, Canada, Iran, and the United States.*

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Festival Recap: Iranian Film

After the United States, Iran boasted the highest number of officially-selected films in the 2016 Atlas Awards International Film Festival. Out of the nine Iranian films selected for the festival, three received Atlas Awards this year.

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Festival Recap: Films in Central America

Two films featured in this year’s Atlas Awards International Film Festival were shot on-location in Central America: the French feature film Defenders of Life, shot in Costa Rica, and the American short film The Jungle of Jules Levine, shot in Panama. (The Jungle of Jules Levine is also the recipient of this year's Atlas Award for Best Visual Effects).

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Festival Recap: Social Causes

The 2016 Atlas Awards Official Selection features independent voices in contemporary film on important social causes and issues. Films this year called for the protection of the natural environment, presented the harsh realities and aftereffects of violent conflict, challenged the flaws of criminal justice in the United States, uncovered buried secrets of the Second World War, and illuminated modern challenges to the rights of women, transgender people, and indigenous people around the world.

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Festival Recap: Experimental Films & Innovative Collaborations

Films showcased at this year’s festival include works whose collaborative production methods, uncommon subject matter, and experimental presentation set them apart from the mainstream. This year’s art films, experimental films, and collaborative films expanded boundaries of expression and challenged traditional methods in film production with experimental writing and imagery, shocking themes, and innovative democratic film collaborations.

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Festival Recap: Award-Winning Filmmakers

Many films showcased and awarded at the 2016 Atlas Awards International Film Festival have screened internationally, garnered critical acclaim, and won prestigious prizes — even before arriving at the Atlas Awards. Here are some of the highlights of this year's Official Selection:

  • The Short Film Corner of the Cannes Film Festival screened two films selected for this year’s festival: Mousse and Where Are You My Love?, the latter of which is also the recipient of this year’s Human Rights Award.
  • Abbas Rafei’s narrative feature Oblivion Season, which follows the travails of a former sex worker in present-day Tehran, features as its lead actress Sareh Bayat — recipient of the Silver Bear for Best Actress at the Berlin International Film Festival in 2011 for her role in Asghar Farhadi’s acclaimed (and Oscar-winning) A Separation.
  • Nina Gilden Seavey, the director of Parables of War, this year’s Best Documentary Short Film, is the Emmy Award-winning documentary filmmaker of A Paralyzing Fear: The Story of Polio in America. (Her films have been nominated for five National Emmy Awards.) She is the recipient of the Erik Barnouw Prize for Best Historical Film of the Year, The Golden Hugo,Cine Special Jury Prize, The Italian National Olympic Cup for Best Sports Film, among many other awards. Seavey is the director of The Documentary Center in the School of Media and Public Affairs at The George Washington University, which she founded in 1990. She has been named one of the top 50 professors of journalism in the U.S., was named a Woman of Vision by Women in Film and Video, and received a commendation for Outstanding Service to the Industry by Discovery Communications.
  • Tim Labonte, director of the documentary Who Did It? The Clue VCR Game, also worked on the documentary Haiti: Triumph, Sorrow, and the Struggle of a People, which won an Associated Press Award for Best Documentary and was nominated for an Emmy for Outstanding Societal Concerns Program in the Boston/New England Chapter.
  • Pechorin, from Russian director Roman Khrushch, won Best Feature Film at the London Film Awards, Best Director at the New Hope Film Festival, and the Platinum Remi Award at the 46th Worldfest-Houston International Film Festival. (Khrushch can now count Best Production Design and Best Costume Design in this list — both awarded to Pechorin at this year’s Atlas Awards.)
  • Agnus Dei, Agim Sopi’s feature drama from Kosovo and the recipient of two Atlas Awards this year, was also awarded Best Foreign Film at the London Film Awards, Best in Festival at the London Crystal Palace International Film Festival, Best Feature Film at the Ionian International Film Festival, and many other awards.
  • Helio, this year’s winner of the Atlas Awards for Best Action Film and Best Science Fiction Film, has also been awarded Best Cinematography at the Widescreen Film Festival and Music Video Awards in Miami as well as Best Short Sci-Fi and the Audience Award at the Miami International Science Fiction Film Festival.
  • New Generation Queens won Best International Documentary at last year’s Manhattan Film Festival.
  • The Berlin International Film Festival hosted the world premiere of Rosso Papavero, the Slovakian film by Martin Smatana that won the Atlas Award for Best Animated Film this year.
  • Miss C, the officially-selected screenplay by Kelly Jean Karam, won Best Screenplay at the Peachtree Village Film Festival and Best Feature Script at the California Women’s Film Festival.
  • Grace, the officially-selected screenplay by Lynda Lemberg and Jeffrey Allen Russel, is the recipient of 71 awards, including the Grand Prize at the Hollywood Hills Screenplay Competition.
  • Saman Hosseinpuor, the director of Autumn Leaves and Fish, both in this year’s Official Selection, won his second Atlas Award for Best Director, becoming the only filmmaker to win the award two years in a row — and the only filmmaker to win multiple Atlas Awards in multiple years.
  • The Man Who Fed His Shadow has been officially-selected at 140 festivals (including at Raindance, at which it was nominated in the category of Best International Short), has received 32 awards, and has qualified for the British Academy of Film and Television Arts.
  • Baobabs between Land and Sea has screened in film festivals, received awards, and has been featured internationally in news outlets such as RFI (Radio France Internationale). The film’s director, Cyrille Cornu, is a researcher at CIRAD, ‘the French agricultural research and international cooperation organisation working for the sustainable development of tropical and Mediterranean regions’, and is one of the world’s leading specialists on the baobabs of Madagascar.
  • The Best Horror Film this year was The Eve, also the recipient of more than 50 other international awards.

 

 

The Atlas Awards are generously sponsored by FilmFreeway.

 

For the 2016 Atlas Award winners and the full Official Selection, visit this year's awards page.

For the full 2016 festival schedule with film synopses, visit this year’s festival page.

*Countries with the same representation are listed in alphabetical order.